UNT Faculty Awards

A quality faculty is one of the hallmarks of a great university.  The impact of faculty members on student success and the research enterprise make them one of the most valuable resources on campus.  Nowhere is their influence more profound than here at UNT where 1,077 dedicated faculty members provide great learning opportunities in a supportive environment, engage in cutting-edge research, and enhance the image of the university by their work every day.

Salute to Faculty Excellence is just one of the many ways that UNT honors the dedicated faculty who help shape our institution and contribute to our Four Bold Goals.  The University of North Texas Foundation, Inc. recognizes three new faculty awards.  As a partner with the University of North Texas, the UNT Foundation enhances the educational mission of the institution by accepting, investing, and/or managing private gifts, endowed funds, and other assets for the benefit of the University and its students.  (Click here to read more regarding the Faculty Success program)

ABOUT THE BRONZE

The UNT Foundation commemorative bronze awards were designed by Stan Briney, a local artist, retired physician and former department chair of the UNT Health Science Center.  Commissioned by the Salute to Faculty Excellence committee, Briney’s work capture the excellence and rich history of the institution, drawing inspiration from important buildings on campus, the majestic eagle mascot, and contemporary UNT branding.

Each of the UNT Foundation Award recipients will receive a signature bronze medallion, and a bronze eagle figure will be given to the Eminent Faculty award winner.  Throughout the year, the bronze eagle will be displayed in the honoree’s department to publically recognize their accomplishments and to acknowledge the support of fellow colleagues, administrators, students, and support staff.  Unlike other awards, the Eminent Faculty bronze eagle will rotate each year from department to department as new winners are announced, creating a legacy of pride over time and across the institution.

Eminent Faculty Award

The UNT Foundation Eminent Faculty Award recognizes a faculty member who has made outstanding and sustained contributions to scholarly-creative activity, teaching, and service.  As one of the highest faculty achievements at UNT, the eminent Faculty Award recipient serves as an inspiration for the entire UNT community. 

  2017 RECIPIENT: THOMAS CUNDARI, REGENTS PROFESSOR
CHEMISTRY
Dr. Thomas Cundari, Regents Professor of Chemistry, was born in Brooklyn, NY and obtained a B.S. in Chemistry at Pace University. After completing his Ph.D. at the University of Florida, he spent a postdoctoral year at North Dakota State University. He joined the faculty of the University of Memphis in 1991, and in 2002 he moved to UNT. Professor Cundari has supervised 38 PhD students, 7 postdocs, and 61 undergraduate students in his 26-year faculty career. His research group has published 340 refereed scientific papers, primarily in the leading journals of the American Chemical and Royal Chemical Societies. Professor Cundari has given 150 invited lectures across the U.S. and abroad. His team has managed 69 grants and contracts for federal, private and industrial donors, totaling more than $10 million. Cundari Group alumni have gone on to research positions in national labs, industry and academia.
  2016 RECIPIENT: DAVID MASON, REGENTS PROFESSOR
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Mason is the Johnie Christian Family Peace Professor, Regents Professor of Political Science, and Director of UNT's undergraduate Peace Studies Program. He is co-founder of UNT's Castleberry Peace Institute, the only peace science and human security research center in the southern United States. His work earned him sufficient recognition among his peers that, following the events of September 11, 2001, he was one of fifteen scholars from leading universities around the world who were named to the American Political Science Association's Task Force on Political Violence.
  2015 RECIPIENT: ANGELA WILSON, REGENTS PROFESSOR
CHEMISTRY
Wilson, a Fellow of the American Chemical Society and National Associate of the US National Academies, leads an internationally renowned research team that is working to create a chemical model that will accurately compute the energetics across the periodic table. In September 2012, the International Innovation journal featured Wilson as one of the leading "Trailblazers of North American Research." Funded by the National Science Foundation, Wilson, along with her team, works on computing periodicity with the goal of producing a basis for accurate computational chemistry by utilizing thermodynamics.
  2014 RECIPIENT: RICHARD ROGERS, REGENTS PROFESSOR
PSYCHOLOGY
Rogers has studied the Miranda rights and their use across the country for more than a decade. Over that time, Rogers has found that some of the warnings used to inform defendants of their rights may instead confuse them, especially juveniles. His research and discovery prompted the American Bar Association to call for clear and concise Miranda language for juveniles across the country.
  2013 RECIPIENT: RANDOLPH "MIKE" CAMPBELL, REGENTS PROFESSOR
HISTORY
No one has changed how we think about Texas' past and its connection to the South more profoundly than Campbell.  The renowned scholars, teacher and mentor joined UNT's history department in 1966 and has served as a Regents Professor since 1988.  As a leading contemporary historian of Texas, Campbell has pioneered work in local and county records, redefining the model for grassroots research and community studies in the field.
  2012 RECIPIENT: BRUCE BOND, REGENTS PROFESSOR
ENGLISH
Bruce Bond exemplifies faculty excellence through his teaching, service, and creative work.  Professor Bond was instrumental in propelling UNT's creative writing program into national prominence upon his arrival in 1995 serving as the Director of Creative Writing and Poetry Editor of American Literary Review. As a renowned poet and critic, Professor Bond has published eight full-length books of poetry, four chapbooks, and over 500 poems and 20 critical essays, which have appeared in top anthologies and journals such as Best American Poetry, The Yale Review, The Georgia Review, Raritan, and Contemporary Literary Criticism to name a few.

Community Engagement Award

The UNT Foundation Community Engagement Award recognizes a faculty member who has the sensitivity to understand and work across organizational boundaries and the leadership to build bridges among community institutions.

 

2017 RECIPIENT: MARIELA NUNEZ-JANES, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
ANTRHOPOLOGY
Dr. Mariela Nuñez-Janes is Associate Professor in UNT’s Department of Anthropology. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Lawrence University, and a master’s and Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico before joining UNT’s faculty in 2003. An applied anthropologist, Professor Nuñez-Janes conducts action-oriented research involving migrant and Latino youth in order to address educational and social injustices. She is the lead editor of the open source book Deep Stories: Practicing, Teaching and Learning Anthropology with Digital Storytelling and a founding member of La Colectiva, a UNT faculty mentoring group for women of color. She has published numerous books, book chapters, journal articles, and other scholarly works.

 

2016 RECIPIENT: M. JEAN KELLER, PROFESSOR
KINEISOLOGY, HEALTH PROMOTION, AND RECREATION
Dr. Keller has dedicated much of her work to under-served school populations in the North Texas region who attend what are called "hard to staff schools' in both urban and rural districts and to underrepresented students in colleges and allied health professions. Her major service initiatives prepares students for academic success throughout their lives; it educates families to better prepare their children for good educations, jobs, and lives; and it saves taxpayers money when students complete degrees, earn credentials, and are ready for careers. Dr. Keller's many notable accomplishments also include creating and implementing the Allied Health Pathways, a partnership with regional Early College High Schools, UNT, and UNT Health Science Center that has supported 18 Hispanics and African American males earn their Doctorates in Physical Therapy and become licensed therapists who are addressing health disparity issues in North Texas.

 

2015 RECIPIENT: DONNAL EMMANUEL, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
MUSIC EDUCATION
In 2011, Emmanuel was appointed to the President's Council for Community Engagement, where she collaborated with other members to create a strategic plan and form an advisory committee made of members of multiple communities across the North Texas region. In the spring of 2013, she was invited to become a member of the Division of Community Engagement for the University, where her primary roles are to move toward a successful application for the Carnegie Community Engagement status, assist in the SACS accreditation writing process for community engagement, and to develop and implement a formalized process for defining, designing, and assessing service learning components on campus.

 

2014 RECIPIENT: MARK VOSVICK, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
PSYCHOLOGY
Vosvick played a key role in the acquisition of the archives of the Resource Center Dallas that trace 60 years of the history of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender social movements in the North Texas region. The collection includes documents, letters and articles as well as artifacts like a T-shirt from the 1979 National March in Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights. Acquiring the collection after years of negotiating was significant, Vosvick says, because they will help scholars study how the experience of the LGBT community was different in the south than it was in the east or west..

  2013 RECIPIENT: RUTHANNE "RUDI" THOMPSON, PROGRAM DIRECTOR
DALLAS ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION INITIATIVE
Rudi Thompson provides learning opportunities for citizens of all ages on issues that impact the environment.  Her commitment began at UNT with her participation in the development of the Elm Fork Education Center in 1995.  Through the years, Thompson has brought in elementary students from more than 65 school districts in the North Texas region to participate in the hands-on, inquiry-based science program.  The Environmental Education Initiative, funded by the city of Dallas, has allowed Thompson to work with more than 900,000 Dallas residents on water conservation issues.  In addition, through SMART Schools, a state-supported program, Thompson has worked with school communities throughout Texas, from Amarillo to San Antonio, on issues concerning energy.
  2012 RECIPIENT: ARMINTA JACOBSON, PROFESSOR
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Arminta Jacobson embodies community engagement and outreach by serving the youngest members of our community - our children and their families.  Professor Jacobson founded the Center for Parent Education in 1993 and continues to lead the center's efforts by sponsoring annual international conferences, hosting summer institutes, leading research and evaluation projects for parenting and marriage education, and providing resources for professionals, students, and parents.  She is also the founder for the Texas Association of Parent Educators and serves as the principal investigator for the Texas HIPPY Corps Project, a parent education home visitation program for parents of preschoolers.

Faculty Leadership Award

The UNT Foundation Faculty Leadership Award acknowledges a faculty member who significantly impacts the academic enterprise thorough innovative initiatives, leadership, and service.

  2017 RECIPIENT: JOHN ISHIYAMA, UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED RESEARCH PROFESSOR
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Dr. John Ishiyama is University Distinguished Research Professor of Political Science and has been at UNT since 2008. From 2012 to 2016 he served as the Editor-in-Chief of the American Political Science Review, the world’s leading political science journal and was the founding editor of the APSA Journal of Political Science Education. He is currently principal investigator and director of the National Science Foundation-Research Experience for Undergraduates (NSF-REU) program on Civil Conflict Management and Peace Science. Professor Ishiyama’s research interests include democratization and political parties in post-communist Russian, European, Eurasian, and African politics, ethnic conflict and ethnic politics, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Recently he has also authored several research articles on the politics of North Korea, a country which he has followed closely for many years. He has published extensively on these topics, producing eight books and over 130 journal articles. He was a member of the American Political Science Association (APSA) Executive Council, and an executive board member of the Midwest Political Science Association and Pi Sigma Alpha (the national political science honorary society). He has also served as the President of the International Studies Association-Midwest Region and is currently a Vice President of Midwest Political Science Association. Professor Ishiyama has received numerous awards including the International Studies Association’s Quincy Wright Distinguished Scholar in 2009, the 2010 APSA Heinz Eulau Award for Best Political Science journal article by the APSA, the 2016 Charles Bonjean Best Article Award by the journal Social Science Quarterly, and the 2015 Distinguished Teaching Award, the highest award for teaching conferred by the APSA. He has received major grants from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Education, the Department of State, and the APSA.
  2016 RECIPIENT: NARENDRA B. DAHOTRE, UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED RESEARCH PROFESSOR
MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
Dahotre has been recognized for his pioneering contributions to fundamental understanding and engineering of laser-materials interactions along with implementation of high power lasers in materials processing and advanced manufacturing, additive manufacturing, and machining. His research has generated funding support in excess of $7.5 million from government and industrial organizations..
  2015 RECIPIENT: DAVID MASON,  REGENTS PROFESSOR
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Mason established the Castleberry Peace Institute, the only one of its kind in the southwest United States. The Institute is a world-class center for the study of peace, conflict, and human rights. After the Institute's establishment, Mason was instrumental in designing a successful proposal for the Human Security, Democracy, and Global Development Research Cluster. Mason was also one of the key members who brought the editorship of the International Studies Quarterly (ISQ), the premier journal in international relations, to the Political Science department at UNT and served as its Editor-in-Chief from 2007-2008.
  2014 RECIPIENT: STANLEY INGMAN,  PROFESSOR
COLLEGE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND COMMUNITY SERVICE
Stan joined UNT in 1990 and has worked on community projects in the Denton and Dallas areas. His programs for public housing, building sustainable neighborhoods, afterschool care, senior adult care and preschool immunization have received several national grants. As a principal investigator for more than two dozen studies, Ingman has received approximately $6 million in research funding. He also has seen some of those projects as the basis to develop sustainable neighborhoods and businesses in Mexico. It has also led to the formation of two schools where children learn to make their own neighborhoods thrive.
  2013 RECIPIENT: ANGELA WILSON,  DIRECTOR
CENTER FOR ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING AND MODELING
Angela Wilson is a fellow of the American Chemical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  Wilson leads a research team that is working to create chemical models that will accurately compute energetics across the periodic table.  In 2008, Wilson was designated as a lifetime national Associate of the U.S. National Academies for her extraordinary service to the National Research council in its role as advisor to the National Research Council in its role as advisor to the nation in matters concerning science, engineering and health.  Wilson has served three times as one of six U.S. delegates to the International Union of Pure and Applied chemistry (IUPAC) General Assembly to represent U.S. interests.
  2012 RECIPIENT: MARY HARRIS, REGENTS PROFESSOR
TEACHER EDUCATION & ADMINISTRATION
Mary Harris provides leadership in areas that improve education for thousands of students either directly or through the education of teachers.  Her focus is teacher education and professional development during the early years of teaching, professional development schools, interdisciplinary and integrated curriculum and performance assessment and accountability.  Major initiatives under her co-leadership include the Teach North Texas (TNT) mathematics and science teacher education program and the North Texas Regional P-16 Council.  Through her work with TNT, Professor Harris is committed to increasing the number of highly qualified STEM teachers in the state of Texas working with area school districts and to closing the gaps in student achievement through work with Regional Service Centers, area school and community college districts, chambers of commerce, and non-profit organizations.

Outstanding Lecturer Award

The UNT Foundation Outstanding Lecturer Award recognizes a full-time lecturer who has made significant and sustained contributions to the University as evidenced by the quality of their teaching and service. The award is the university's highest honor for full-time lecturers.

  2017 RECIPIENT: ROSSANA BOYD, PRINCIPAL LECTURER
TEACHER EDUCATION AND ADMINISTRATION
Dr. Rossana Boyd, Principal Lecturer in UNT’s Department of Teacher Education and Administration, earned a bachelor’s degree from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras, a master’s degree in education from Southeastern Louisiana University, and a Ph. D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Louisiana State University. Dr. Boyd specializes in bilingual and English as a second language teacher preparation. Her academic passion is to prepare teachers to provide instruction to students whose language other than English in grades pre-kindergarten to 12.th. Her advocacy efforts include active participation as an executive board member of the National Association for Bilingual Education, including a stint as president in 2011-2012.

Professor Boyd also serves as the director of her department’s Bilingual/English and a Second Language Education Programs. She is the main advisor for the Student Organization, BESO and is a strong advocate of English as a Second Language and bilingual pre-service teachers. Professor Boyd has secured scholarship funding from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for the past 10 years totaling $1.2 million and funding from the US Department of Education winning for the Title III National Professional Development Project NEXUS. She recently learned that she and her team have been awarded a 5-year $2.8 million grant from the US. Department of Education to implement another competitive Title III National Professional Development grant, Project SUCCESS in Language and Literacy Instruction.

As principal investigator, over the past ten 10 years Professor Boyd has brought to her department more than $4.5 million in internal and external funding to help develop the bilingual/ESL teacher education program and to benefit a large number of pre-service teachers with scholarships and other support. Professor Boyd also collaborates on cross-disciplinary projects with colleagues from other departments and colleges at UNT. These collaborations have resulted in more than $1.5 million in research funding.

  2016 RECIPIENT: WENDY l. WATSON, SR. LECTURER
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Watson teaches courses on American politics, constitutional law, public policy, and quantitative research methods. She is an innovator whenit comes to pedagogy, especially in the case of large sections. Examples are a classroom simulation designed to mimic a constitutional convention in the wake of a zombie apocalypse, and another is a simulation of the Electoral College. She established an Innocence Project clinic at UNT, through which law students and undergraduate interns work together to investigate innocence claims of those convicted of crimes. Dr. Watson has been recognized for these innovations and for her passionate and effective teaching, winning the University Core Curriculum Innovation Award and wit the J.H. Shelton Award for Teaching Excellence.
  2015 RECIPIENT: LESLI ROBERTSON, SR. LECTURER
FIBERS, COLLEGE OF VISUAL ARTS & DESIGN
Lesli Robertson's areas of expertise include installation artwork, community engagement, weaving and Ugandan cultural arts. For several years, Robertson studied the culture of East Africa, focusing on bark cloth from Uganda. Robertson has received grants from the Dallas Museum of Art, the Surface Design Association, the Textile Society of America, and has received a faculty fellowship with the UNT Institure for the Advancement of the Arts in support of her artwork and research.

Read More on the Awards and Recipients

© Copyright 2011 - UNT Foundation - All Rights Reserved, Privacy Policy